Summer Upper-Level Undergraduate Courses

Human Anatomy with Lab, Human Physiology with Lab, Microbiology with Lab, and Biochemistry
 
Tentative 2019 Dates (Subject to Change): June 3 – August 3
 

 

Keck Graduate Institute (KGI) offers introductory courses to the principles of Human Anatomy and Human Physiology with technology-enhanced modeling that students will use on their own device. Using this innovative cyber-anatomy technology, students will explore the human body using a “virtual cadaver” in a simulated 3D space, as well as using physical models. Students keep the technology license as a reference tool for their own future use.

Biochemistry is an eight week course and utilizes a hybrid teaching model of online lecture material with a weekly live discussion period. 

In Microbiology, students will learn about fundamental and 21st century microbiology principles, microbial genetics and genomics techniques, and will become familiar with important bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, with emphasis on clinical applications. Lab portion of the course will work on developing skills in using modern microbiology techniques and tests used in a clinical microbiology laboratory, and on developing critical thinking.

These courses fulfill prerequisite requirements for entrance into KGI’s School of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; however, all students are welcome to apply.

Schedule:

For a detailed schedule of each course, see the corresponding tab below.

Location: 

KGI Campus
535 Watson Drive
Claremont, CA 91711

Details regarding where your course will meet will be provided to you prior to the course start date.

Contact:

SummerPrograms@kgi.edu for additional information.

Costs:

$475 per Credit Hour. Financial aid available

Deadline:

Rolling applications 

KGI is a member of the Claremont Colleges and a WASC accredited institution – check your local academic advising center for transferability of credits.

  • Offered: June 5-August 4, 2018

    All online materials will be available by course start date. Further details are forthcoming.

    This eight week course utilizes a hybrid teaching model of online lecture material with live instruction and work in small groups. Online course work can be done according to the student’s schedule.

    Instructor: Dr. Derick Han (with Carl Decker)

    Lecture Schedule: Tuesdays, 4:15-6:15 p.m. (starting June 5)

    Prerequisites:

    • General Biology I and II with labs
    • General Chemistry I and II with labs
    • Organic Chemistry I and II with labs

    Course Description

    This course provides an overview of the main aspects of biochemistry by relating molecular interactions to their effects in humans.  Energy/thermodynamics, macromolecules, bioenergetics and integrative biochemistry concepts will be addressed through the study of structures, functions and interactions of macromolecules that govern fundamental biological processes.  The course is designed to serve as a pre-requisite for students seeking careers in the health professions.

    Course Goals

    At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe key biochemical processes that characterize living organisms.
    • Describe the laws of thermodynamics and explain their relevance to biochemistry.
    • Explain catabolism and anabolism and describe the overall chemical reactions associated with these processes.
    • Explain the differences between equilibrium, homeostasis, and steady-state.
    • Define Gibbs free energy (△G), enthalpy, and entropy and describe their relevance in a chemical reaction.
    • Describe key chemical properties of water and the types of bonds involving water.
    • Define acids, bases, and buffers and write out acid-base equilibrate for important biological molecules.
    • Describe the reduction-oxidation reactions that occur for carbon macromolecules in autotrophs and heterotrophs.
    • Describe the properties that make oxygen gas a strong oxidation and explain its role in metabolism.
    • Recognize the basic structures of key macromolecules (lipids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates), identify functional groups, and describe their utilization within cells.
    • Identify the 20 amino acids and describe the key chemical characteristics of each amino acid.
    • Draw out a peptide bond and describe key features of this bond.
    • Explain primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures for proteins.
    • Recognize various post-translational modifications that occur in proteins and describe their  function and significance in cells.
    • Explain factors that modulate reaction rates and explain how catalysts work.
    • Describe mechanisms by which enzymes modulate reaction rates but not △G.
    • Explain how the Michaelis-Menten equation is derived and describe the importance of Lineweaver Burke graph.
    • Describe how inhibitors and allosteric effectors modulate enzyme activity, using some drugs as examples.
    • Describe the overall process of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, and identify the key regulatory steps of these processes.
    • Explain how glycogen is regulated in the liver.
    • Describe the overall chemical processes that occur in the citric acid cycle.
    • Explain the key steps involved in oxidative phosphorylation and list the major proteins involved.
    • Define free radical, reactive oxygen species, and antioxidant, and describe their role in physiology and pathophysiology.
    • Provide an overview of fatty acid synthesis and fatty acid degradation, and identify similarities and differences between the two pathways.
    • Describe the key steps involved in DNA replication.
    • Define exon and intron, and describe their functionality in cells.
    • Explain the difference between mRNA, tRNA, and rRNA, and describe how they are utilized in cells.
    • Describe the key steps involved in protein translation.
    • Describe several strategies involved in gene regulation in eukaryotic cells.
    • Explain the major types of cell communication utilized in mammalians cells and describe key steps involved in each.
    • List important metabolic and genetic changes that occur in cancer cells.

    Topics Covered

    • Introduction to Biochemistry
    • Energy/Thermodynamics
    • Water and Life
    • Overview of the cell
    • Macromolecules – amino acids
    • Overview of the carbon cycle
    • Enzyme Kinetics – inhibition and allosteric effects
    • Cell Signaling
    • Glycolysis and Gluconeogenesis
    • Fatty acid catabolism and synthesis
    • Glycogen Metabolism
    • Regulation of metabolism
    • Biomembranes and transport
    • DNA replication and repair
    • RNA metabolism
    • Protein Translation
    • Regulation of gene expression
    • Molecular biology of cancer
     

    Course Delivery

    Lectures will be delivered asynchronously and are recorded by faculty to be accessible on-line by students through Google Drive at Keck Graduate Institute at their convenience.  Additional course materials including readings, grades, and assignment will be made available through the Learning Management System, Sakai. Students are responsible for watching video lectures during the week at their own pace.  Students are required to come to KGI or attend a weekly online review session as stated above (see: Lecture Schedule) for discussion of the week’s topics.

    Exams and quizzes will be given electronically at the discretion of the instructor.

  • Offered: June 5-August 4, 2018

    This eight-week course blends lectures with active learning activities in labs and small groups to deepen their understanding and knowledge of human anatomy. The course is taught on Saturday mornings.

    All online materials will be available by course start date.

    Instructor: Dr. Jennifer Ruiz

    Lecture Schedule: Saturdays, 8-10 a.m. (starting June 9)

    Laboratory Schedule: Saturdays, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.

    Prerequisites: General Biology I and II with labs

    Course Description

    This course is designed for any student interested in entering the health professions. Human Anatomy is the integrated study of the gross and microscopic anatomy of the human body. At the end of the course students will have an understanding of the human architecture and how the microscopic and gross forms adhere to the concept of “shape/organization confers function”. This course includes eight laboratory sessions. Prerequisite: One semester of college biology. Credits are transferable, however please check with the institution you wish to transfer credits to prior to taking this course.

    Course Goals

    At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Link basic concepts of introductory biology courses and reveal how those fundamental ideas play a crucial role in understanding the body’s architecture, organization, and function
    • Discuss the interdisciplinary nature of the natural sciences and how mathematics provides the foundation for Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Human Anatomy
    • Identify how laws of thermodynamics and energy are crucial to the human body’s complex architecture (shape/organization)
    • Recognize how anatomical “shape/organization confers function”
    • Express a molecular point of view to gross anatomy and that the idea that one cell, one organelle, or even one macromolecule can have profound effects on the entire human body
    • Identify the basic hierarchy, function, and different diseases emanating from each organ system within the human body

    Topics Covered

    • Anatomy Terminology and Organization
    • Cellular Anatomy
    • Histology
    • Histology Surface Anatomy
    • Integumentary System
    • Skeletal System
    • Articular System
    • Respiratory System
    • Urinary System
    • Central, Autonomic and Peripheral Nervous System
    • Senses
    • Endocrine System
    • Muscular System
    • Cardiovascular System
    • Circulatory/Lymphatic System
    • Gastrointestinal System
    • Reproductive System

     

    Course Delivery

    Lectures will be delivered in the first half of the morning session, followed by active learning labs for the last half. Course materials include readings and access to the Visible Body 3D software application, as well as plastic models incorporated into the lessons. All assignments and grades will be made available through the Learning Management System (LMS). Students will be provided with instructions on how to access the LMS. Students are responsible for keeping up with all work and are required to come to KGI on Saturdays for discussion of the week’s topic(s), as well as to participate in a 3D virtual Human Anatomy Lab using Visible Body technology through the KGI-Visible Body partnership.

    Exams and quizzes will be given electronically at the discretion of the instructor.  Laboratory periods will be conducted for 4 hours on Saturday’s for 8 weeks over the summer session.

    Weekday online coursework:
    Enrolled students should expect three to four hours per day of coursework.

  • Offered: June 5-August 4, 2018

    This eight week course blends lectures with active learning activities in labs and small groups to deepen their understanding and knowledge of human physiology.

    All online materials will be available by course start date.

    Instructor: Dr. Jerome Garcia

    Lecture Schedule: Saturdays, 1-3 p.m. (starting June 9)

    Laboratory Schedule: Saturdays, 3-5 p.m.

    Prerequisites: General Biology I and II with labs

    Course Description

    This course is designed for any student interested in entering the health professions and covers the study of human organ and tissue functions. As a survey course of the fundamental principles of human physiology, we will delve into molecular mechanisms within the cells to the actions of tissues, organs, organ-systems, and how the organism as a whole adapts to certain phenomenon. Laboratories emphasize inquiry and the use of instrumentation in physiological studies. Human physiology is recommended for Biology, Chemistry, and Movement and Sports Sciences majors interested in a Health Science Career. This course includes eight laboratory sessions. Credits are transferable, however please check with the institution you wish to transfer credits to prior to taking this course.

    Course Goals

    At the conclusion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Discuss physiological processes in the human organism at the cellular, tissue, and organismic level
    • Link basic concepts of introductory biology and human anatomy courses and reveal how those fundamental ideas play a crucial role in understanding molecular mechanisms
    • Discuss the interdisciplinary nature of the natural sciences and how mathematics provides the foundation for Physics, Chemistry, Biology, and Human Anatomy
    • Identify how laws of thermodynamics and energy are crucial to the human body’s complex architecture (shape/organization)
    • Recognize how anatomical “shape/organization confers function”
    • Define a basic foundation of signaling cascades.
    • Identify the basic hierarchy, function, and different diseases emanating from each organ system within the human body

    Topics Covered

    • The Study of Body Function and Chemical Composition Cells and Enzymes
    • Heart and Circulation
    • Regulation of Metabolism
    • Metabolism/Interactions
    • Cardiac Output
    • Digestive System
    • Respiratory Physiology
    • Excretory System Physiology
    • Nervous System Physiology
    • Muscle Physiology
    • Sensory Physiology
    • Immune System
    • Endocrine Physiology
    • Reproductive Physiology
     

    Physiology Laboratory Topics

    • Protein Determination
    • Enzyme Activity
    • Senses
    • Cell Viability
    • Blood Workshop
    • EKG Workshop
    • Urinalysis
    • Amylase Workshop

    Course Delivery

    Lectures will be delivered in the first half of the morning session, followed by active learning labs for the last half. Course materials include readings and access to the Visible Body 3D software application, as well as physical lab activities incorporated where appropriate. All assignments and grades will be made available through the Learning Management System (LMS). Students will be provided with instructions on how to access the LMS. Students are responsible for keeping up with all work and are required to come to KGI on Saturdays for discussion of the week’s topic(s), as well as to participate in active learning labs.

    Exams and quizzes will be given electronically at the discretion of the instructor. The course schedule details are forthcoming.

    Weekday online coursework:

    Enrolled students should expect three to four hours per day of coursework.

  • Offered: June 5-August 4, 2018

    The didactic portion of the course will be taught using live instruction with the emphasis on active learning during the class as well as small group activities. The laboratory exercises are designed to develop critical thinking and to familiarize the students with modern microbiology techniques and tests, clinical microbiology techniques, as well as expose the students to the field of microbial genetics and genomics.

    Instructor: Dr. Anastasia Levitin

    Lecture Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10:30 – 11:50 a.m. (starting June 5)

    Laboratory Schedule: Tuesdays and Thursdays, 1-4 p.m.

    Prerequisites: General Biology I and II

    Course Description

    The goals of this Lecture/Laboratory course are for students to learn about fundamental and 21century microbiology principles including metagenomics, human microbiome, microbial fuel cells and global climate change. The laboratory part of the course will coincide with the lecture portion of the class.

    Course Goals

    After completion of this course, students should:

    • Become familiar with important bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, with emphasis on clinical applications
    • Learn pertinent facts concerning the role of microorganisms in disease
    • Understand and be able to perform various lab techniques
    • Develop critical reading skills

    Topics Covered

    Lectures:

    Introduction to microbiology Microbial molecular biology and genetics
    Microbe classification and Microscopy Antimicrobials
    Bacteria Mechanism of genetic variation
    Eukaryotic microbes Pathogenicity and host response
    Viruses and other acellular infectious agents Clinical microbiology and immunology
    Microbial physiology/metabolism Epidemiology and public health microbiology
    Microbial growth Human diseases causes by microbes

     

    Laboratory exercises:

    Introduction/Safety Isolation of Normal Microbiota
    Microscopic techniques Staphylococci/streptococci
    Bacterial morphology and staining Endospore-forming bacteria
    Basic laboratory and culture techniques Urine test
    Eukaryotic microorganisms Bacterial transformation
    Bacteriophages Bacterial conjugation
    Hemagglutination Genetic Complementation and Recombination